New York Company, Three Officers
Pleaded Guilty To Water Violations

Martisco Paper Company, Inc., of Marcellus, N.Y., Darryl Meiers,
president and owner of Martisco, and David Meiers, operations
director at Martisco, both of Marcellus, N.Y., and Michael Dodrill
of Syracuse, N.Y., Martisco's Production Manager; all pleaded
guilty on Aug.1 to violating the Clean Water Act. In their plea,
the defendants admitted that over a period of 10 years they engaged
in the illegal nighttime disposal of pollutants from the Martisco
plant into Nine Mile Creek. Disposing of pollutants into surface
waters can harm fish and wildlife and can make those waters
unsuitable for recreation and drinking. If the plea is accepted by
the court, Darryl Meiers would serve a year and a day in prison and
contribute $2,500 to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
(NFWF), David Meiers would serve a year and a day in prison and
contribute $1,500 to the NFWF, Michael Dodrill would serve a year
and a day in prison, and the Martisco Paper Company would serve
three years probation and contribute $40,000 to the NFWF. The case
was investigated by EPA's Criminal Investigation Division and the
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. It is
being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Syracuse, N.Y.


Florida Company Pleads Guilty
to Violating Clean Water Act

Grease Depot, Inc. of Largo, Fla., pleaded guilty on August 9 to
violating the Clean Water Act by failing to report sampling results
to the City of Largo in violation of a pretreatment permit. Under
the permit, Grease Depot was required to pretreat wastewater
discharged into the Largo sewer system. During 1999, the defendant
had been found to be in violation of its permit and the City of
Largo increased the cost which Grease Depot had to pay to treat its
wastewater. In January 2000, the defendant hired a private firm to
test its wastewater for Chemical Biological Oxygen Demand (CBOD)
and then submitted the results to the City of Largo. The defendant
knowingly omitted the reports that stated it was out of compliance.
Discharging wastewater with higher than permitted levels of CBOD
can raise the cost of sewage treatment at public treatment
facilities and also be harmful to fish and aquatic life if
wastewater with high levels is released from sewage treatment
plants into surface waters. When sentenced, the defendant faces a
fine of up to $500,000. The case was investigated by EPA's
Criminal Investigation Division, the FBI, the City of Largo, the
Pinellas County Sheriff's Office and the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. It is being prosecuted by the U.S.
Attorney's Office in Tampa.
 

Florida Employee, Firm Indicted for Damaging Wetlands

Emilio A. Perez and Emi-Sar Trucking and Equipment, Inc. of Palm
Beach County, Fla., were indicted on August 8 on charges that they
violated the Clean Water Act and damaged federal property by
dumping mixed solid wastes, including agricultural wastes, into
wetlands at Bay Bottom and Sand Cut in Palm Beach County. Part of
the wetlands belong to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Wetlands
provide fish and wildlife breeding grounds and water purification.
Dumping can destroy these environmental values. The case was
investigated by EPA's Criminal Investigation Division and the
Environmental Investigations Unit of the Palm Beach County
Sheriff's Office. The case is being prosecuted by the U.S.
Attorney's Office in Miami.
 

Indiana Plant Operator Falsifies Permit Application

Keith Miller of Lynnville, Ind., pleaded guilty to falsifying a
sewage treatment plant discharge permit in a plea agreement on July
26. Miller was Vice President of Certified Wastewater Consultants,
Inc., that operated and managed the Lynville wastewater treatment
plant. He submitted an application to the Indiana Department of
Environmental Management to renew the treatment plant's Clean Water
Act discharge permit, falsely stating that the plant would not
accept any industrial process wastewater. Miller knew that
Lynnville Sewage Works was accepting and processing industrial
process wastewater from Waste Stream Technologies, a company owned
by Miller that recovered petroleum products from water. Falsifying
wastewater discharge permit applications can lead to the discharge
of pollutants from sewage treatment plants that can harm fish and
wildlife and make surface waters unsuitable for recreation and
drinking. The plea agreement recommends that Miller spend six
months in home detention and be subject to such fines as the court
may determine. The case was investigated by EPA's Criminal
Investigation Division and is being prosecuted by the U.S.
Attorney's Office in Evansville, Ind.